If we as humans can “see” water but can’t “see” air, can fish see water but not air? With climate change affecting the weather on land and melting the glaciers in the south pole, there is a potential future of living underwater for the remaining inhabitants of Earth.

As demonstrated by The Shape of Water, humans may one day physically adapt to the the environment in the future. Although not all of Earth will be covered in water, many Asiatic countries that are home to millions of people will sink below the ocean if global warming continues. Because of this, humans will turn to many different forms of technology to aid their living, in almost the same way the contestants of the Goblet of Fire did when competing at the Great Lake. This force will be beneficial in development of both scuba gear and spacesuit garments, as both must be heavily tested in pools of water before use.


I decided to study and contribute to wearable/fashion technology because it is currently in high functional demand and can be easily manipulated for aesthetic design. Sci-Fi has always been my favorite genre (my favorite book is Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and Star Trek has been a part of both my mother’s childhood and mine. I believe that my personal interest in our project topic will allow me to continue developing designs for integrating technology into fashion design for functional use in the foreseeable future.


I imagine that in the future, we will find that life is sustainable on other planets. While the residents of Earth will mainly live underwater and have adapted physically to the environment, those who inhabit each planet has a different lifestyle and has physically adapted to better suit the environment (ex.: residents of Jupiter, a gas giant, have wings to fly and are used to the planet’s high constant velocity while residents of Neptune have developed a heat absorbing extra layer of skin). Even today, we see that, on average, humans are much taller than what they used to be due to natural selection.